Stolen Rhodes: Falling Off the Edge

Stolen Rhodes:  Falling Off the Edge

Written by Ellen Marie Hawkins

Stolen Rhodes:  Falling Off the EdgeThe easiest way to describe Stolen Rhodes to someone who hasn’t heard them is to put them under the genre of classic rock.  They could fit in with the Allman Brothers or Springsteen and have your dad, or even your grandfather, scratching his head wondering why he doesn’t remember these songs.  It’s almost uncanny how a young band could capture the essence of a time period that precedes them by at least a generation, yet their other influences and experiences make them uniquely their own.  They are, after all, anything but a copycat, tribute band.

Favorites included “Blue Sky” for not only the sweeping length of the song, but the versions of love it contains-from the love between a man and a woman to the love between a parent and a child, especially as the child has reached manhood and gives his life for the country he loves.  Instead of depressing, it’s uplifting; that life, in the grand scheme of things, comes down to that one word…love.  “Beautiful Way” is absolutely gorgeous.  Gor-geous.  “Freight Train” also deserves a mention for the fact that I wanted to see one, I wanted to be on one, I wanted to be carried away every time I heard it.  And I was, at least for the five minute, twelve minute endurance of the song.

I was swept away by their romantic notions; of big dreams, endless love, and freedom.  I could also get lost in the neverending choruses just as much as the guitars and drums and keys that make this album a long jam session that I didn’t want to end.  I’m also impressed by all this album isn’t; while classic rock can often portray the political unrest, the anger, the sarcastic whining of that era, Stolen Rhodes isn’t about making a statement or getting lost in fleeting pleasures that elude happiness.  While the name of their band came from the long forgotten brand of piano that may or may not have been thieved (from them, or someone else), I like instead the image of a road they’ve “borrowed” instead.  I like the paths they’ve chosen, and better yet, I like that they’ve made this music and let me in on the journey.

Please visit www.stolenrhodes.com for more information, and be sure to download legally from a digital retailer of your choice.

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