Getting Started On Guitar

Many of you will agree that there’s no instrument quite as cool as a guitar. From tranquil, airy pop ballads to the blistering solos of metal, this instrument can fill a wide variety of roles, and even if you’re not much of a player, you’re going to look good with one hanging over your neck! Whether you’ve got a dream of being a pro musician or just want to see what all the fuss is about, here are some great tips for getting started with guitar.

Pick Your Instrument

The guitar industry is absolutely huge. If you have a look around any music store, you could quickly begin to feel overwhelmed by all the different makes and models. The first thing you want to do is find out about the technical differences between types of electric guitars via buzzharmony.com or a similar website. Your choice here is mainly going to depend on the kind of music you want to play. Cutaway acoustics are better for country, for example, and through-neck electrics with Floyd roses are better for rock and metal. The next main piece of advice we can offer is not to spend too much, or too little. While you generally get what you pay for with guitars, you don’t want to spend $1,500 on a new Stratocaster, only to drop the hobby a few weeks in. Many low and mid-range guitars get a decent tone, and will teach you the basics, which is what your first guitar should be for.

Get a Head Start

As you may be aware, some of the greatest guitarists who ever lived were completely self-taught, including Jimi Hendrix and Slash. However, if you want to get the best possible start in playing guitar, we recommend getting at least a small block of professional lessons. Having a teacher observe you can help to wean you off of some of the common bad habits that beginner guitarists tend to pick up. These really aren’t anything to worry about when you’re first starting out, but as you try to tackle more advanced music, they can become a major obstacle. Look up a local tutor, or find a service that allows you to take lessons over Skype. After around ten hours, you’ll have a good enough foundation to go it alone if you want to. The internet is bursting with YouTube tutorials on songs and techniques, not to mention a whole library of free tablature, covering almost every song with a guitar part!

Practice, Practice, Practice

We’ll close with the most important tip of all. A lot of people get frustrated with slow starts in music, and wonder why they’re not making the progress they want. The whole mystery is actually one of the simplest concepts in the world: the more you practice, the better you’ll get, and the sooner you’ll get where you want to be. There are going to be times where you don’t want to play guitar, but you have to power through these if you want to see quick results! See uberchord.com for some great practice tips.